What is Asbestos?

Asbestos was used to a great extent in home construction from the 1940s through the 1970s. It’s a highly efficient and cheap material used for thermal and acoustic insulation, as well as a fire retardant.

Homes that were built before 1975 can have asbestos, which was used on basement boilers and pipes for thermal insulation

Checking for asbestos

To test for asbestos in your home, a visual inspection is usually not sufficient. Typically, one should send suspected asbestos fibers to a certified laboratory to be analyzed.

Two approved methods of asbestos testing are Polarized Light Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. To find laboratories near you that are certified to do these kinds of analysis, you can search the National Institute of Standards and Technology online. Also, The Environmental Protection Agency offers detailed guidance for how to gather samples of asbestos fibers.

Health hazards of asbestos

Long-term exposure to hazardous asbestos fibers can have dire effects on human health. The fibers are inhaled easily and are carried into the lower regions of the lung, causing fibrotic lung disease asbestosis. Furthermore, they radically change the lining of the chest cavity.

These are grave conditions that can lead to reduced respiratory function and death. Lung cancer and mesothelioma are also caused by long-term inhalation of asbestos fibers.

Clearly, removing damaged asbestos as quickly as possible is critical.

Asbestos removal

Removing asbestos in a home depends largely on where it is found and its condition. Asbestos becomes airborne by being easily crumbled or turned into a powder is known as friable asbestos. Asbestos that is tightly bound with another material so that the fibers can’t be easily airborne is known as non-friable asbestos. Asbestos-containing material that is currently in good condition, where dangerous fibers are not being released is not necessarily dangerous. But in such a case, the situation still needs to be monitored for any signs of deterioration.

In the end, removing asbestos is the only permanent way to guard against any asbestos problems in the home. But, since asbestos removal can cause the release of dangerous fibers, it must always be done by a licensed and bonded professional asbestos removal company. Make sure that they are using approved respirators, disposable clothing, and a HEPA vacuum ensure that any minuscule fibers haven’t been released into

Cost of asbestos removal

The cost of removing asbestos varies based on the extent of the work. Most contractors charge a fee of $1,500 to $3,000 regardless of the size of the job. For complete removal, a 1500 square foot home where walls floors, ceilings, attic, roof, and pipes are covered in in asbestos, prices could be exorbitant. In such cases, be prepared to spend between $20,000 to $30,000.

Given the dangers of Asbestos and the costliness of its removal, your best option might be to sell the home as quickly as possible. Your best option is to sell to the real estate professionals at Homevestors.com.

We’ll buy the house outright, with cash, as-is.

Contact Homevestors.com today to learn more about our solutions to asbestos removal and the associated costs.